Mary Cummins, Real Estate Appraiser, Animal Advocates, Los Angeles, California

Mary Cummins, Real Estate Appraiser, Animal Advocates, Los Angeles, California
Mary Cummins, Real Estate Appraiser, Animal Advocates, Los Angeles, California

Wednesday, September 29, 2021

Los Angeles County Assessor Office offers real estate appraisal, job training and jobs by Mary Cummins

 

A New Jobs Partnership

 

The Los Angeles County Assessor’s Office has conceived an innovative jobs training program with two local community colleges that has constructed a direct pipeline to good-paying County jobs. 

 

Furthermore, the Assessor’s Office has entered into these partnerships with the local community colleges because it produces an actual pathway to employment designed to bolster the workforce not only in the Assessor’s Office but in other County departments as well.

 

They are the Real Estate Appraiser III Certificate Program at West Los Angeles College and the Appraiser Assistant Training Program at Rio Hondo College.

 

Both of these new programs fall under the category of “first-of-its-kind,” as articulated by the Los Angeles Community College District; and most importantly, they fill the need of replacing those 30 or so valuable appraisers that leave the Department each year through retirements, job relocation, among other attrition factors. Our September Newsletter spotlights these remarkable programs.

 

 

 

A Project in the Making

 

When Assessor Prang was first elected in 2014, he immediately identified the challenge of attracting and retaining qualified job candidates to the Department. Having spent decades in the public sector as a city councilmember, mayor, assistant city manager, and even special assistant in the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, he was well- aware of recruitment challenges. It was one of the most daunting tasks he faced.

 

In a good year, the Assessor’s Office could typically train in-house about 30 new appraisers, and that’s when a new class could be launched. There were even some years when new classes were not possible and vacancies went unfilled. The Office needed help.

 

Assessor Prang began to contact outside agencies to see if there were alternatives. The Los Angeles Community College District as well as Rio Hondo College were willing to help. Also, he solicited support from the Board of Supervisors because he believed that the entire County could benefit from a new pathway for providing training for specialized positions in general, not just for the Assessor’s Office. The Board was more than willing to help.

 

Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit like a thunderbolt and crippled an already struggling economy. Everything changed and the need for qualified candidates increased exponentially.

 

In August of 2020, Supervisor for the First District Hilda L. Solis, who leads the Boards efforts on its workforce development initiatives, put forth a motion asking “the Department of Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services (WDACS), in collaboration with the Assessor, … to develop … a comprehensive review of training programs and curriculums currently offered” at the local colleges.

 

It was done and after much discussion and collaboration, the following was the result.

 

 

THE PROGRAMS

 

 

1. Real Estate Appraiser III Certificate of Achievement Program

 

The training for this current class of 51 Appraiser Trainees at West LA College is comprised of students hired this past spring. The goal is to shift much of the Assessor’s in-house classroom training for basic appraisal principles to the college classroom.

 

Assessor appraisers from the newest Real Property Class 78 are taking two of their courses at West LA College. The courses are part of their Appraiser Training Certification Program (ATCP) which is typically run entirely in-house. This year three courses are taught in-house, then they go to WLAC for the last two courses. All other training (on-the-job training) is done in-house.

 

This program will achieve a number of important objectives:

1.  It will allow the Department to maintain a consistent pipeline of qualified and trained candidates for employment in the Office of the Assessor.

2.  It will make good-paying County jobs available to the community.

3.  It will relieve the Office of the internal stresses that occur when providing in-house training for employees, which detracts from the Assessor’s primary mission of producing a complete and thorough Assessment Roll.

 

In summary, the Assessor’s Office needs to hire about 30 +/- Real Property and Business Property Appraisers annually just to keep up with attrition and this innovative program will better ensure that the Office can maintain an optimal level of personnel to do the important work in producing the annual Assessment Roll. The Los Angeles County Office of the Assessor is the largest in the nation with a total complement of appraisers that exceeds 700; thus the appraiser position can offer an unlimited career advancement opportunity, even in other County departments, and not just the Assessor’s Office.

 

 

2. Appraiser Assistant Training Program

College students with a minimum of 60 college credits may apply to the Appraiser Assistant Training Program at Rio Hondo College. The training program is comprised of four tuition-free, noncredit courses. The noncredit courses in the program are Real Estate Principles, Real Estate Appraisal, California Property Taxation & Assessment, and Career Preparation: 21st Century Skills.

 

Upon successful completion of the program, students will receive a noncredit certificate in California Property Taxation and Appraisal, and an opportunity to apply for employment at the Assessor as an Appraiser Assistant. The Appraiser Assistant Training Program is expected to be offered on an annual basis at Rio Hondo College to mitigate attrition, promotions, and retirements, and also intended to be duplicated at other community colleges should the need for Appraiser Assistants increase. The training program reduces the time required to train Appraiser Assistants by creating a pool of qualified candidates that have been trained on job-essential assessment topics prior to applying for employment.

 

After two years’ experience, Appraiser Assistants may apply to participate in the Assessor’s one-year Appraiser Trainee Certification Program (ATCP) and, upon successful completion, become state-certified property appraisers. They are then eligible for positions within the Appraisal series. Conversely, Appraiser Assistants who meet eligibility requirements may also subsequently seek promotion to positions within the Assessment series.

 

It’s estimated that as many as 50 students have already enrolled at Rio Hondo for the Appraiser Assistant - and successful graduates will qualify to immediately fill 16 positions in the Assessor’s Office. Eventually, they will learn the skills to become candidates for Appraiser positions, and potentially enjoy a career with the Office of the Assessor with many opportunities for upward mobility. The Office is also exploring adding other positions to this program that require extended specialized training.

Mary Cummins of Cummins Real Estate is a certified residential licensed appraiser in Los Angeles, California. Mary Cummins is licensed by the California Bureau of Real Estate appraisers and has over 35 years of experience.


Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary, Cummins, #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit real estate, appraiser, appraisal, instructor, teacher, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Pasadena, Brentwood, Bel Air, California, licensed, permitted, certified, single family, condo, condominium, pud, hud, fannie mae, freddie mac, fha, uspap, certified, residential, certified resident, apartment building, multi-family, commercial, industrial, expert witness, civil, criminal, orea, dre, brea insurance, bonded, experienced, bilingual, spanish, english, form, 1004, 2055, 1073, land, raw, acreage, vacant, insurance, cost, income approach, market analysis, comparative, theory, appraisal theory, cost approach, sales, matched pairs, plot, plat, map, diagram, photo, photographs, photography, rear, front, street, subject, comparable, sold, listed, active, pending, expired, cancelled, listing, mls, multiple listing service, claw, themls, historical appraisal, facebook, linkedin

Tuesday, September 28, 2021

California Assembly Bill AB 948 signed by Governor inre Real Estate Appraisal, Bureau of Real Estate Appraisers, by Mary Cummins

California Bill AB 948 Bureau of Real Estate Appraisers, Real Estate Appraisal , Mary Cummins, Los Angeles, Governor Gavin Newsom, signed, license, continuing education, bias, complaints, race, discrimination

Governor Gavin Newsom just signed California Assembly Bill AB 948. AB 948 modifies and adds regulations for appraising, buying, selling, making loans on real estate in California. The new regulations have to do with any alleged bias from anyone. This includes lenders, mortgage brokers, real estate agents and real estate appraisers. 

It's already illegal to discriminate in real estate and housing per the Fair Housing Act of 1968. This new bill basically just restates that. It also adds new educational requirements in regard to bias. They aren't additional educational hours. They are just specific hours for new applicants and renewals.

The bill amends "Sections 11340 and 11360 of, and to add Sections 11310.3 and 11424 to, the Business and Professions Code, to add Section 1102.6g to the Civil Code, and to amend Section 12955 of the Government Code, relating to real estate."

From the Bill, "LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST AB 948, Holden. Bureau of Real Estate Appraisers: disclosures: demographic information: reporting: continuing education.

Existing law, the Real Estate Appraisers’ Licensing and Certification Law, creates a Bureau of Real Estate Appraisers within the Department of Consumer Affairs to administer and enforce that law. Existing law requires the protection of the public to be the highest priority for the bureau in exercising its licensing, regulatory, and disciplinary functions.

This bill, among other things, would require the bureau to place on an existing complaint form a check box asking if the complainant believes that the opinion of the value of the real estate is below market value. The bill would also require the bureau to collect specified demographic information, voluntarily provided, regarding sellers, those seeking to refinance, buyers, or an authorized representative in real estate transactions making a complaint. The bill would require the bureau to compile the collected demographic information and report that information to the Legislature on or before July 1, 2024.

This bill would prohibit a licensee from basing their appraisal of the market value of a property on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, source of income, sexual orientation, familial status, employment status, or military status of either the present or prospective owners or occupants of the subject property, or of the present owners or occupants of the properties in the vicinity of the subject property, or on any other basis prohibited by the federal Fair Housing Act.

Existing law requires the Chief of the Bureau of Real Estate Appraisers to adopt regulations governing the process and procedures for applying for a license, including education and experience equivalency, and for renewal of a license, including, but not limited to, continuing education requirements on a 4-year cycle.

This bill would require, beginning January 1, 2023, an applicant to complete at least one hour of instruction in cultural competency, as defined. The bill, as part of the continuing education requirement in order to renew a license or restore a license to active status, would require for each licensee renewing on or after January 1, 2023, at least 2 hours of elimination of bias training. Beginning January 1, 2023, a licensee would be required to complete at least one hour of instruction in cultural competency every 4 years.

Existing law requires that specified disclosures be made upon transfer by sale, exchange, real property sales contract, lease with an option to purchase, any other option to purchase, or ground lease coupled with improvements, of any single-family residential property.

This bill, after July 1, 2022, would require that every contract for the sale of single-family residential real property contain a notice stating that any appraisal of the property is required to be unbiased, objective, and not influenced by improper or illegal considerations. The bill would require the notice to include information regarding reporting biased appraisals to the financial institution or mortgage broker that hired the appraiser or the Bureau of Real Estate Appraisers. The bill would also require the notice to be delivered by a licensed person, as defined, refinancing a first lien purchase money loan secured by residential real property containing no more than 4 dwelling units either prior to, or with, the loan estimate or the mortgage loan disclosure statement.

Existing law, the California Fair Employment and Housing Act, prohibits housing discrimination, including discrimination through public or private land use practices, decisions, or authorizations, and based on specified personal characteristics. Existing law makes it unlawful for any person or other organization or entity whose business involves real estate-related transactions to discriminate against any person in making available a transaction, or in the terms and conditions of a transaction, because of specified personal characteristics.

This bill would make it unlawful for any person or other entity whose business includes performing appraisals of residential real property to discriminate against any person in making available those services, or in the performance of those services, because of race, color, religion, sex, gender, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, familial status, source of income, disability, genetic information, veteran or military status, or national origin."

Link to actual bill below.

https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220AB948

This bill appears to be a political response to a couple of California media articles about alleged bias in real estate appraising. One article was about Cora Robinson who filed a complaint. Based on my research the first appraisal was within the range of market value. I did a FOIA request to get a copy of the investigation results and will post them here when they are available. Another article was about Saleem Shaheed. This was another case where the first appraisal was within the range of market value. Shaheed did not file a complaint. 

September 21, 2021 Marcia Fudge the head of HUD stated that there were few complaints for racial bias in appraising. I looked at the HUD stats and agree. A lot of the outrage in the media is from a handful, about five actually, alleged cases of alleged low appraisals caused by alleged racial bias. I researched the five cases and wrote articles in this blog about them. The first appraisals were within the range of market value. They were not low. The markets were quickly appreciating. The second appraisals came in over market value because the second appraiser used comps outside of the area which were not true comparables. I will be posting the results of the FOIA requests of the two complaints filed here.

A lot of these recent claims of alleged racial bias stem from the change in political climate related to George Floyd. "The country is in a time of racial reckoning, heightened by a summer of protests against systemic racism and police brutality following the death of George Floyd in police custody." Floyd's death "sparked the largest racial justice protests in the United States since the Civil Rights Movement." "According to data from various sources, the Black Lives Matter movement is now the largest movement in US history." While racism exists and must be banished from our nation the pendulum has now swung to the extreme side. In this new light anything and everything is automatically "racist" today before even looking at the facts.

It light of everything that is currently happening I believe real estate professionals need to educate their clients and the public about the real estate appraisal, lending and selling processes. Generally the person reading the appraisal report is not the client. The client is the AMC and the lender. The report is made for real estate professionals and not lay people. I think it's a good idea for appraisers to add language for lay people who will probably end up reading the report. Some of the complaints about reports that I've read clearly show that the reader doesn't understand market value or the underwriting process. I believe this has caused some to assume that any value they don't like must be "racism" when it's not. 

Mary Cummins of Cummins Real Estate is a certified residential licensed appraiser in Los Angeles, California. Mary Cummins is licensed by the California Bureau of Real Estate appraisers and has over 35 years of experience.


Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary, Cummins, #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit real estate, appraiser, appraisal, instructor, teacher, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Pasadena, Brentwood, Bel Air, California, licensed, permitted, certified, single family, condo, condominium, pud, hud, fannie mae, freddie mac, fha, uspap, certified, residential, certified resident, apartment building, multi-family, commercial, industrial, expert witness, civil, criminal, orea, dre, brea insurance, bonded, experienced, bilingual, spanish, english, form, 1004, 2055, 1073, land, raw, acreage, vacant, insurance, cost, income approach, market analysis, comparative, theory, appraisal theory, cost approach, sales, matched pairs, plot, plat, map, diagram, photo, photographs, photography, rear, front, street, subject, comparable, sold, listed, active, pending, expired, cancelled, listing, mls, multiple listing service, claw, themls, historical appraisal, facebook, linkedin

Monday, September 27, 2021

Fannie Mae - Racial Bias in Appraisals - by Mary Cummins Real Estate Appraiser, Los Angeles, California

fanniemae survey racial bias in appraisals, real estate appraiser, fannie mae, freddie mac, racial bias, discrimination, survey, fha, home loan, diversity

Fannie Mae just had a survey for appraisers about racial bias in appraising. Oddly enough I didn't receive an email or notice about it even though I'm on the list. Thankfully appraisers are sharing the survey. It'd be nice if the appraiser organizations would also share the survey besides the government notifying interested parties. 

I think a survey is a good start. While there is currently a lot of talk about bias in appraising in the media I don't believe there is actually that much bias in appraising. It's a math formula based on numbers. At least a couple of software programs and then a few different people review each appraisal. The lenders, AMCs want the deal to go through. If they thought the appraiser was biased and killing their deals, they'd end up on the do not use lists and never be used again. 

There is a lot of talk about bias in the media. The three main media stories about racial bias have been false. I did a FOIA request to get a copy of the investigation results of two of the cases in which people filed complaints. One didn't file a complaint. I'm still waiting for results. HUD makes it difficult by forcing you to file a new FOIA every 30 days because the investigation isn't complete. All other government departments only make you file one. They give you the results of the investigation when it's over. 

Below are some of the questions. I am including my answers to the two free form questions at the end.








Question: "What can appraisers do to decrease racial bias in appraisals and incidents that increase reputational risk for the profession?" 

(My response is to the second part of the question) "Appraisers should explain appraisal theory, methodology, comparable search, comparable adjustments, comparison of the subject to the comparables, why specific comparables were chosen over others, comments and overall report better for lay people buyers, sellers who will read it even though they are not the client. This is important because they are the ones who complain, file complaints and tell the media their generally mistaken interpretation of the report i.e. any value which doesn't meet their expectation "must be racial bias." Fannie Mae could add a form for lay people so they can properly understand, interpret the report and know how to properly request a reconsideration of value if merited."

Question: "What can Fannie Mae do to decrease racial bias in appraisals?" 

Answer: "While I agree racism and racial bias exist I don't feel it's a major issue in appraising today. Buyers, sellers, agents are upset that appraisal values aren't meeting contract price which is currently higher that market value due to lack of inventory and low interest rates. People refinancing are upset that values aren't meeting their false high perceptions of value of their home. Fannie Mae can help reduce the false perception of mass racial bias with buyer, seller, agent education about appraisal theory, process, reports and how to submit merited reconsideration of value requests."

I personally feel that there are some people that will take some rejections and automatically assume bias because they've been discriminated against in the past. Some of these people need education about appraisals and valuations. Three appraisers can appraise the same property and come up with three different numbers. The variation should be slight if we're talking average sized tract homes, condos in areas with median prices homes, a sufficient turnover rate, home supply and a median density. There will be more variation on the extreme ends of value. Even Zillow admits this with their algorithms. That's why they don't give a Zestimate for homes above or below a certain price range. They also don't give Zestimates in areas of lower priced homes because their formula is not as accurate with limited data, older homes and homes in inferior condition. This is per Zillow themselves. Corelogic has a similar statement about their estimates. 

Mary Cummins of Cummins Real Estate is a certified residential licensed appraiser in Los Angeles, California. Mary Cummins is licensed by the California Bureau of Real Estate appraisers and has over 35 years of experience.


Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary, Cummins, #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit real estate, appraiser, appraisal, instructor, teacher, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Pasadena, Brentwood, Bel Air, California, licensed, permitted, certified, single family, condo, condominium, pud, hud, fannie mae, freddie mac, fha, uspap, certified, residential, certified resident, apartment building, multi-family, commercial, industrial, expert witness, civil, criminal, orea, dre, brea insurance, bonded, experienced, bilingual, spanish, english, form, 1004, 2055, 1073, land, raw, acreage, vacant, insurance, cost, income approach, market analysis, comparative, theory, appraisal theory, cost approach, sales, matched pairs, plot, plat, map, diagram, photo, photographs, photography, rear, front, street, subject, comparable, sold, listed, active, pending, expired, cancelled, listing, mls, multiple listing service, claw, themls, historical appraisal, facebook, linkedin

Wednesday, September 22, 2021

ASC Fall Roundtable September 22, 2021, Appraisal Sub Committee, Building a More Equitable Appraisal System, by Mary Cummins


My notes of the meeting are below.

"The ASC Fall Roundtable will closely examine issues of bias and inequities facing the appraisal industry and how to chart a path forward.

About this event

On September 22, 2021, the Appraisal Subcommittee (ASC) will convene the ASC Fall 2021 Roundtable: Building a More Equitable Appraisal System, to address historical and contemporary factors that have contributed to the inequities challenging the appraisal system today. We urge you to join us for this groundbreaking event, which will convene leaders in government, finance, real-estate, non-profits, and communities impacted by the appraisal system. The full lineup of speakers will be announced in the coming week.

The ASC Fall 2021 Roundtable will take place virtually on September 22 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET (8:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. PT) and will include featured speakers, audience question and answer sessions, theme-based concurrent breakouts, and closing comments outlining next steps.

Confirmed speakers include:

Secretary Marcia L. Fudge is the 18th Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Throughout her career, Secretary Fudge has worked to help low-income families, seniors, and communities across the country.

Marc H. Morial is the President and CEO of the National Urban League. Over the last 15 years, Mr. Morial has expanded the reach of National Urban League services by empowering the League’s affiliate movement and creating a framework to create policies that serve communities of color.

Rodman Schley, MAI, SRA is National President of the Appraisal Institute, the nation’s largest professional association of real estate appraisers. Mr. Schley serves as Senior Managing Director for BBG, leading teams of managing directors and appraisers throughout the western United States.

Timothy Segerson is Chairman of the Appraisal Subcommittee and Deputy Director of the Office of Examination and Insurance with the National Credit Union Administration. Mr. Segerson is responsible for implementation of national policy relating to examination, supervision, insurance and guaranty fund risk management.

Jillian White, SRA is Head of Collateral at Better.com. A 17-year veteran of the appraisal industry, Ms. White providers critical leadership for Better, a direct lender dedicated to providing a fast, transparent digital mortgage experience backed by superior customer support.

Johnnie White is CEO and Executive Vice President at the American Society of Appraisers. Mr. White brings a distinguished career as an association professional serving in a variety of management and leadership roles, and as an adjunct faculty member at Georgetown University.

The goals of the roundtable are to: 1) engage audiences around the challenges and opportunities of building a more equitable appraisal system; 2) educate stakeholders on issues of bias and inequity in the appraisal process; and 3) collaborate with ASC’s partners on potential strategies for achieving a more equitable appraisal system. The key outcome of this interactive event will be a set of potential actions for implementing change, both near- and long-term, at local and systemic levels across the industry.

We will share the link to the livestream in the week leading up to September 22.

This event is free and open to the public, and media are welcome to attend. Please note that video and audio of this virtual event will be recorded."

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/asc-fall-2021-roundtable-building-a-more-equitable-appraisal-system-tickets-165140580923

Tough taking stills live. I'll take better ones when the video comes out. UPDATE: Video was supposed to have been out within a week and still no video. 

____________________________

The link to the meeting wasn't working so I had to email the coordinator to get the Zoom link. This caused me to miss first 15 minutes. I'll post link to video and transcript when it's up. These are my notes. What's in ( ) is my comment.

A brief summary. There was a lot of talk about "acknowledging" racism and bias in appraising. They all said we must "get to the bottom of it" and "do something about it." Everyone kept saying they aren't bashing, blaming appraisers or calling them racists. They actually have been doing that without any evidence or data to support these claims including in the meeting. They stated this is a "systemic problem" "baked into" the "location, location, location" or sales comparison approach to value. Many said we need to get rid of the sales comparison approach and use a different value method such as income or replacement methods. Those people know nothing about appraising because those approaches consider land and income which are based on location. Another main topic was the appraisal trainee program needed to become a licensed appraiser. I agree the program needs to be changed. 

Jillian White, BetterMortgage: (Jillian was giving her same speech about her parents' home being appraised) "I was told by the agent I had to "erase" my parents' living and "dead relatives" from their home besides collectibles and books in order to sell the house." (All agents tell ALL of their clients to remove any personal photos, memorabilia, collectibles, clutter and small items. Buyers want to see themselves in the home and not the owner, whoever they are. This is not for the appraiser but the buyers. Is Jillian saying all home buyers are racists? Here is one article about preparing your home for sale by removing personal items, photos, awards, taste specific art... ). Below is a still from her presentation pointing at the items she was allegedly told to remove.


Jillian said her parents were okay with the appraisal value but Jillian was not so she sent in a rebuttal. The alleged rebuttal allegedly changed the price by $100,000. 

Most appraisers are 55 years plus, 70% are male and 96% white. (Wrong. While most are over 50 and male they are not 96% white. The AI data showed 85%. The AI data includes ASC approved certified appraisers and appraisers at an AI event only so the results are skewed. Actual % is lower.  The US population is 76% white. Most real estate agents are about equally white at 75% and people don't complain). It's not a formula for success when white people represent the industry. Because of the trainee program one must know an appraiser to become appraiser (so they are white). 

UPDATE: BetterMortgage is Jillian White's boss. The CEO of BetterMortgage is Vishal Garg who is a known investment scammer in the finance industry according to this Forbes article. They posted that most appraisers are basically white racists who are biased and intentionally come in lower than contract with black people and Latinos. That is a misinterpretation of the actual research which is here. They cited the same 96% white statistic with a link to the CPS Labor stats. The labor stats are based on only in person or telephone polls! We all know telephone polls aren't reliable. Neither are in person polls. Regular people don't pick up the phone with unknown numbers or answer the door to strangers. They only asked one person in the household to answer for everyone. BetterMortgage is cherry picking misleading numbers based on bad statistics. BetterMortgage stated that Jillian said appraising is a “mix of science and artistry, and the artistry is where the unconscious bias comes in.” Appraising is a science and a math formula. If it weren't, AVMs could not exist. Everything appraisers do is based on data, facts, math and science. There is no artistry. If Jillian believes artistry is involved, she should hang up her appraisal license right now. BetterMortgage is sadly using Jillian White though she is going along with it eyes wide open for a paycheck. 

B Doyle Mitchell: (He's chairman of minority bank association.) Industrial bank was established in 1934. We support black wealth via home ownership. Conscious racism. Unconscious bias. We've seen disparity in values based on who the appraiser is. The majority of our appraisers are African American. Sometimes we use others (whites) and we see the bias in our own appraisers. A $100,000 price change is unseen. Maybe $10K, $20K but not $100. (It depends on price range of homes. $100,000 is not much when you're talking multi million dollar homes. The $100,000 is only what Jillian said. We don't know the real appraisal or alleged change in value)

Many whites who aren't consciously biased are unconsciously biased. It could be the case in the industry. If you don't understand our struggle, our lack of capital...you don't understand. We proposed to regulate the minimum requirements (to pass appraisal exam) because of disparity in exam results. We lost. We need more examiners (appraisers). 

Bad economies are worse for African Americans. When the economy catches a cold, blacks get pneumonia. (This happens with all poor people)

Michael Akin of Link Strategic Partners introduced Rodman Schley, President of Appraisal Institute AI. 

Schley: We're trying to bring about positive change, diversity. We're working with Fannie, Freddie, Urban League. We got $3M from Chase to work on individual initiatives. We have scholarships for minority women.

Redlining, segregation, these challenges led to inequities. 44% of blacks own home, 75% of whites. They say there is no evidence of systemic bias in appraisal research. (Then he cites Andre Perry's misleading paper which has many major statistical errors). There are media stories where they feel race played a role. We get upset when we hear these stories. (He read his presentation) We appraisers only mirror what market tells us. We are trying to find where this bias stems from and what to do about it. No profession is immune from unconscious bias. We need to educate about how to interrupt this bias. The new task force should consider appeals, reconsideration of values. We must hire competent appraisers. It's the priority of AI. We're recruiting more women and people of color. (When it costs $15,000 to become a MAI I find that hard to believe). Appraisals are just one piece of the issue.

Marc Morial: I'm president of the Urban League UL. I was the Mayor of New Orleans. I was a Louisiana state Senator. The national UL is involved in the housing arena. We give 50K African Americans home counseling services or home buyer education. Buyer education lowers the foreclosure rate.We develop affordable home ownership. We're building a center with 170 affordable rental housing units and new headquarters. It will include NY's fist civil rights museum. 

The government initiated appraising. They said we will insure loans if it's appraised. That requires a look back at previous valuations of homes owned by white people. That stays with us today. Looking at comparable homes nearby means it's baked into the value disproportionately. A home in a white neighborhood which is the same as one in a black neighborhood is worth less in the black neighborhood (which he feels is wrong).(Me: It's the difference in land value). The disparity in wealth is baked into the housing industry. The science of location location location, the cardinal rule, has to be challenged. A $200,000 home in a white neighborhood verses a $96,000 home in a black neighborhood. They would cost same to rebuild if demolished yet the bank is more inclined to finance the home in the white neighborhood (because loan to value ratio would be less which means less risk to the bank). This is the inherent unfairness in real estate valuation. The racial dynamic is based on location because the neighborhood maybe used to be segregated. It's steering which still occurs today. 

When I went to sell my home in New Jersey I was told to remove my personal photos and African art. (Again, all agents tell ALL their clients to remove personal photos, items just so the home will sell for more and faster) 

This devaluation of black homes impacts everyone. It devalues the overall value of all homes. It reduces all property taxes. The lost wealth is in limbo in a zombie world where real valuations would show greater wealth in the community. OUR research found black homes lost $48,000 on average or $156 billion cumulative losses (That would be Andre Perry's false, misleading and statistically flawed paper). Cy Richardson is our expert. This is unfair, black verses white home ownership. (The differences in black and white home ownership has to do with the fact that black people, POC make less money and have less money than whites. Women also make and have less).  It's better to own than rent. Home ownership is foundational to the American Dream. 

Timothy Segersen: National Credit Union.  ASC initiatives are a review of appraiser criteria and USPAP. Do they promote fairness, diversity? We're doing a survey of appraisal industry and a series of roundtables. We need a better understanding of the challenges. We need to create dialogue for a path forward. Appraisals are just one part of a larger ecosystem. 

Q & A

Q: Why aren't there real estate appraisers and the appraisal industry on the new Biden task force? 

A: There will be. They won't be left out. (Me: The task force will be over in a few months. There isn't any time to add appraisers now. Appraisers have offered to be on the task force and were denied)

Jillian: The Freddie mac report data is recent research. It's five years of data. The study found after you adjust for everything, the borrower, the chance of not hitting the contract price is higher for blacks, black areas, after you adjust for everything (Wrong. They didn't adjust for property value. You're more likely to miss contract price in lower priced areas. Research has shown blacks, POC have less money, buy homes in less expensive areas). It was the most robust report.

Schley: We want them to focus on appraiser data and not AVM data. We want to know where the problems are so they can be part of solutions. (Agreed. Andre Perry's misleading statistically flawed paper was based on AVM data and not appraisers).

Morial: Saying the appraisal is biased doesn't mean the appraiser is cloaked in racial discrimination. It's just the system of how we appraise property which uses three comps in same neighborhood. It's baked into the legacy of segregation. Two areas, black area is undervalued because no capital is coming in. Why is one location more valuable than another? Because of redlining. Commercial property uses income approach. Unique properties don't use comparative method. We might want to use replacement value instead. (You'd still need land value which is based on location). We could think of different methods which have less opportunity for "bias." Is there a better way? Use a different method. (The income approach is still based on location). We need to look at the system. We aren't excoriating the industry. The method is baked in practices from 80 years ago. It's methods, systems and not appraisers. Maybe the system as designed, has bias built into it. (Jillian nods)

There are 300 people here today. 

Mitchell: We hit a nerve here, clearly. Realtors, banks could have own bias but we're here to discuss appraisals which has impact on value of property and deals. The appraisal is supposed to be objective value of what the home is worth. I know lenders and appraisers do have conversations. I work at a bank. I know relationships affect those conversations. (Is he saying he influences appraisers at his bank?)

Jillian: How do we address the gate keeping challenge? We must ask the appraiser board to revisit how unintended consequence enters the supervisory model. The length of time it takes for a trainee. It's expensive. It slows you down. You're training your competition. It's a barrier for POC (everyone, actually. White people complain to me about it). We must move away from the model.

Schley: How do we bring more people into the pipeline. These discussions help. Minority and women's scholarships at AI. They go unused.

James Park:  ASC. Trainee program is a barrier to look at doing away with it. ASC is concerned about the lack of diversity and lack of new entrants. We're working on a census of appraisal industry to understand demographics.  

We will take further questions under advisement. 

Akin: POC can't borrow to fix their homes. 

Schley: There is no real good solution for the systemic problems right now. The cost approach? It includes the valuation of the land and depreciation. The income approach is not applicable as much. We appraisers reflect the market. We don't make the market. If I told you, you can't use comp across street because of system racism, if I go outside the market, how will I reflect that market? It's not just the appraiser. It's the entire system.

(Second part of event is breakout meetings with just a few people and Q & A. One speaker didn't realize he was live and said these people (appraisers) are "feisty." The moderator told him he was live and he stopped. The speakers could see the questions being asked.)

Group 1. Michael Akin, Mark Abbott, Cy Richardson. 

Cy Richardson: It's a systems question. Do we move away from the measurable and discernible. I worked at the national Urban League the oldest African American organization to help African Americans. We are at the bottom of Mt Everest at this challenge. I'm interested in wealth building of people of color. I worked in government as an urban planner. Home ownership is success, wealth... Maybe loans should be based on income only. (They are) Don't personalize the issue (appraisers). It's institutional issues. 

VA program, Tidewater process use alternative non traditional indicators of credit. If you pay rent you build credit. If someone sends monthly remittance back home, build credit. 

Akin: You were in urban planning. You led us to where we are today (joking). 

Cy: Pale, male and stale. That's what appraisers are. (The general consensus is that "pale, male and stale" is racism, sexism and ageism wrapped in a pithy phrase. Cy Richardson has said this previously. He recently stated that CFP's are "pale, male, and stale." Why is it okay for him to make this racist, sexist, ageist statement? Isn't he against racism, sexism and ageism or only when it's directed against himself?)

Akin: We (two older white guys on panel) won't take offense to pale and male but we take offense to stale (uncomfortable joking). 

Abbott: There should be feedback system for appraisers. 

Akin: Introduces Cate Agnew, head valuation expert at Natixis, NY, counselors of real estate. 

Agnew: I've spent 25 years in the appraisal industry as appraiser. Now I do review appraisals for lenders. Profession takes a lot of heat. I know appraisers are feeling targeted. We need to revamp the mentor program. Two years of apprenticeship turns some people out of college off. 

Q: ROV process. With loan denial based on a credit report you get copy of the report with explanation but you don't with denial of loan based on appraisal. 

A: Lender shouldn't just say original lending report stands. Lazy response. We don't want flood of unsupported complaints (to hotlines, government). Statistical modeling may be useful. (Actually the appraiser is instructed to answer the ROV in the report and resubmit it for the borrower to view)

Abbott: Appraisal not owned by borrower or owner of property. 

Agnew: Copy of which is provided to borrower. Maybe too late by that time to file a complaint with the government. Borrower should be the co client. Should get time to reply to the report. (Borrowers get the report within a day of submitting. They send in ROV within 1-2 days. Appraiser has 1-2 days to respond. It's not weeks).

Agnew: What should appraisers do now. Don't pull comps before the inspection. 

Abbott: PAREA. We should adopt other program for trainees.

Johnnie White: (75 people in the room.) CEO of American Society of Appraisers. Adjunct faculty member at Georgetown University. ASA. We have been focusing on diversity at ASA. Changed board documents about diversity, discrimination. We focus on education of unconscious bias. 

Q: What do appraisers do now while wait for changes in the profession?  

A: Appraiser is just one component in process. Must look at all. Must be open to change. 

Q: Why is it the appraiser's issue? Real estate agents also use market data to price home. 

A: Should we be asking appraisers questions now? If you feel something is wrong, go with that gut feeling. Be open to rebuttals. 

Abbott: Policy makers need to listen to appraisers. 

Akin: Criteria for licensing should be federal and over rule states who have right to make them more strict.

Abbott: Agree but Congress cares about states rights. 

Introduces Jillian White as head of collateral at BetterMortgage.

Jillian: I've been an appraiser for 18 years. I've been working at a lender for five years. I speak because there are so few of us (POC). Need to change how new appraisers are made. 

Akin: How appraisers are blamed for everything but can't solve anything.

Q: Appraisers taught not to consider factors that contribute to bias. Now we should recognize and address them when we were told not to even consider them per law?

Jillian: Difference between consideration and acknowledging. The new data based on appraisers and race. The cause is unknown now. (Freddie Mac data) 

Q: "The AQB has approved the PAREA process which eliminates the need for folks to find a mentor. This program has the ability to make a monumental shift in the number of minority appraisers. However, individual states can opt to not approve the PAREA process which inhibits the ability for folks to enter the profession. We need help at the federal level to require states to accept the PAREA process in order to make are profession look more like the social fabric of America."

Akin: Can borrowers appeal an appraisal in your company? 

Jillian: At Better we set up new process for claims of racial bias. People are naturally upset when appraisal doesn't meet contract. People are naturally upset about discrimination. At Better we are tracking this. We look at the appraisal report. Values have been changing. 

Q: Trainees can't do inspections by themselves. 

Jillian: BetterMortgage sells all their loans. We can't sell loans with trainee inspections. It's not up to us. 

Q: Only 12 states allow PIREA. 

Abbott: Is it bias or lack of competence?

Jillian: Can't answer. Hopefully Freddie Mac can answer with their data. 

Q: Should we remove location, location, location as a factor in appraisals?

Jillian: Location is the crux of sales comparison approach. If we start tinkering with that it could unravel everything. We would be further into level of just an opinion. If select comps from all over, the ability to standardize, for fair treatment, becomes more difficult. I don't see that as a solution to move away from location.

Back to main meeting.

White: We have a system that's not the best. It needs changes. It won't happen tomorrow. 

Akin: Wrapping up. Was this an appraiser bashing session? Now we're all in this together. 

James Park: Most missed first 15 minutes. Meeting is recorded. Thanks, everyone.


Mary Cummins of Cummins Real Estate is a certified residential licensed appraiser in Los Angeles, California. Mary Cummins is licensed by the California Bureau of Real Estate appraisers and has over 35 years of experience.


Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary, Cummins, #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit real estate, appraiser, appraisal, instructor, teacher, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Pasadena, Brentwood, Bel Air, California, licensed, permitted, certified, single family, condo, condominium, pud, hud, fannie mae, freddie mac, fha, uspap, certified, residential, certified resident, apartment building, multi-family, commercial, industrial, expert witness, civil, criminal, orea, dre, brea insurance, bonded, experienced, bilingual, spanish, english, form, 1004, 2055, 1073, land, raw, acreage, vacant, insurance, cost, income approach, market analysis, comparative, theory, appraisal theory, cost approach, sales, matched pairs, plot, plat, map, diagram, photo, photographs, photography, rear, front, street, subject, comparable, sold, listed, active, pending, expired, cancelled, listing, mls, multiple listing service, claw, themls, historical appraisal, facebook, linkedin

Thursday, September 9, 2021

Alvarado Terrace Historic District Real Estate Homes in Los Angeles, California, by Mary Cummins real estate appraiser

Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park,
Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park, 


Alvarado Terrace Historical District is a designated historic district in the Pico-Union district of Los Angeles, California. It is located southwest of Downtown Los Angeles, along Alvarado Terrace between Pico Boulevard and Alvarado Street. Alvarado Terrace is a curving street that faces a park.

Scroll down for photos I took today, September 9, 2021 of the homes on Alvarado Terrace.1353 Alvarado Terrace sold for $2,100,000 in 2021. 

"Six homes and a church in the district were designated as Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monuments in 1971, and the entire district was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

The Alvarado Terrace Historic District is within the original Spanish Pueblo of Los Angeles boundaries established in 1781. During the late 19th century, the land was owned by Doria Deighton Jones, the widow of a wholesale grocer. In 1897, the Los Angeles Golf Club (predecessor of the Los Angeles Country Club) leased the land and built a nine-hole golf course that came to be known as "Windmill Links," due to the use of an old windmill as the clubhouse.

Jones subdivided the land into residential lots in 1902. The lots were sold for $10 each, with the caveat that the buyer was required to build a house costing at least $4,000. The area was promoted as a "second Chester Place," referring to the city's most prestigious street in the West Adams district. By 1906, the development was full.

Terrace Park and Powers Place

In an effort to enhance the neighborhood, one of its chief promoters (and president of the City Council), Pomeroy Powers, persuaded the city in 1904 to construct a park along Alvarado Terrace. Originally called Summerland Park, the park was soon renamed Terrace Park. The park included a fish pond, rosebeds, an underground tool shed, and a full-time gardener. The park was later remodeled with only grass and trees. There is a small strip of brick-paved street at the north end of the park known as "Powers Place" that holds the distinction as the "shortest street in Los Angeles." The park and brick-paved street were declared a Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM #210) in February 1979. By 1983, Terrace Park was suffering from neglect and was described as "so bare it's hardly recognizable as a park."

Six homes designated as Cultural Historic Monuments

Alvarado Terrace has the distinction of having six houses on a single block (all on the north side) designated as Historic-Cultural Monuments by the City of Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission. The six houses were designated as Historic-Cultural Monument nos. 83-88 in July 1971. The houses were built on a raised terrace overlooking Terrace Park. The designated homes were built between 1902 and 1905 and reflect a rich eclecticism in their architectural style. They include Craftsman, Victorian, Mission, Tudor, and Shingle style architecture. A real estate brochure from 1903 described the neighborhood this way: "The only exclusive Residential Tract in the city. Beautiful Parks. Shade Trees Planted. High Class building restrictions. No flats, cottages or stores. Wide streets conforming to the contour of the land with cement sidewalks, curbs and gutters. Perfect sewer system, water, gas, electric lights..." With the park and well-preserved homes, the district provides a complete historic neighborhood that has been featured in motion picture and television productions. While the surrounding area has been described as "low-income and multicultural," the Los Angeles Times in 1991 described Alvarado Terrace as "a slice of L.A.'s genteel and moneyed past preserved."

Boyle-Barmore House

As one enters Alvarado Terrace from the north, the first of the designated homes is Boyle-Barmore House, located at 1317 Alvarado Terrace. Built in 1905, the house was designed by architect Charles E. Shattuck in a Craftsman style with Tudor influences, including a three-gabled dormer. The house was built for Calvin A. Boyle, one of the founders of the Hollywood Board of Trade. The house was acquired in 1908 by Edmund H. Barmore, president of the Los Angeles Transfer Company. The house was used in the 1980s as a women's shelter by the Union Rescue Mission.

Cohn House

The second of the designated homes on the north side of the street is the Cohn House at 1325 Alvarado Terrace. Built in 1902, the house was designed by Frank D. Hudson and William Munsell. Hudson and Munsell also designed the Museum of Science and Industry, the first museum built in the city's Exposition Park. Cohn House combines Craftsman style in its first floor of rock-faced sandstone, and a second level reflecting the Shingle style. The house also has three gabled dormers that give the house the look of a Swiss chalet. The house was built for Morris Cohn, a textile manufacturer. Cohn has the distinction of having both his residence and his textile factory designated as Historic-Cultural Monuments (HCM #84 and HCM #110). Cohn House was used in the 1980s as a men's shelter by the Union Rescue Mission.

Gilbert House

Gilbert House, located at 1333 Alvaardo Terrace (pictured above right), was built on speculation in 1903 by Ida and Pomeroy Powers, who also built and lived in the Powers House next door. Gilbert House is one of the most eye-catching homes in the district built with a mix of Victorian, Shingle-Style and Craftsman styles. The house was first purchased and occupied by Wilbur F. Gilbert, a wealthy Texas oil man. Gilbert's daughter, Carolyn McCulloch (d. December 24, 1992), was still living in the house in the 1980s.

Powers House, 1345 Alvarado Terrace

Powers House at 1345 Alvarado Terrace (HCM #86) was built in 1903 for Pomeroy Wells Powers and his wife Ida. Designed by Arthur L. Haley, the home is built in the Mission Revival style, and has been described as "exuberant" and the "flashiest on the block" for its fanciful stucco curlicue. The stucco house has an arcaded veranda that supports a second-floor balcony. Rising from the balcony are towers connected by a curved parapet wall. The large corner tower has a loft room accessible only from the home's exterior.

Pomeroy Powers was a lawyer who was one of the original developers of Alvarado Terrace. He was also a member of the City Council and an officer of the Juanity Mining Company and the Short Line Beach Company. The house was restored in the mid-1970s by owner Ann Gutierrez, including new walls, plumbing, wiring and ceilings. In the 1990s, the house was used as a restaurant known as Salisbury Manor, with dining downstairs and the upstairs consisting of restored bedrooms available for viewing by patrons. A review of the restaurant noted that, "with some myopia and imagination," the restaurant and neighborhood allowed a glimpse of an earlier era. "What with the good decent food, a dose of history tempered with nostalgia, a seat in a shaft of afternoon sun and a cup of chamomile tea in my hand, I couldn't help but think there are far worse things in life than a meal on Alvarado Terrace."

Raphael House

The Tudor-style Raphael House at 1353 Alvarado Terrace (HCM #87), built in 1903, was designed by architects Sumner P. Hunt and Wesley A. Eager. Hunt was also responsible for the Raymond Hotel in Pasadena, the Casa de Rosas in North University Park, the Automobile Club building at Figueroa and West Adams, and Ebell of Los Angeles. Originally owned by Robert H. Raphael, the owner of Raphael Glass Company, the house is noted for its extensive use of both stained and leaded glass. Over the Labor Day weekend in 1995, the owner stripped Raphael House of some of its finer accessories, including stained glass windows, wooden fireplaces, and even the plaques identifying its historical status. The city's Department of Building and Safety stepped in and ordered the owner to return the fixtures or face fines and possible jail time.

Kinney-Everhardy House

Built in 1902, the Kinney-Everhardy House at 1401 Alvarado Terrace (HCM #88) was built by the same architects (Hunt & Eager) who designed the Raphael House next door. The house has been described as "an eclectic combination of elements from both the Queen Anne and Shingle styles."

First Church of Christ, Scientist and the Peoples Temple

Jim Jones' Peoples Temple operated out of this church in the Alvarado Terrace district in the 1970s.

The district also includes the former First Church of Christ, Scientist built in 1912 on an odd-shaped lot at the corner of Alvarado and Hoover Streets. The church was designed by architect Elmer Grey, who was also responsible for the Beverly Hills Hotel (1911), the Huntington Gallery and Library (1910), and the Pasadena Playhouse (1924–25). The church has been variously described as Beaux-Arts, Italian and Spanish Romanesque, and Mediterranean. The building's most notable features include its semi-circular porch with fluted columns, brick tower, rounded arches, and tiled roof.

The building has had a colorful history, having housed Jim Jones' Peoples Temple from 1970 until their move to Jonestown, Guyana in 1977. In 1975, the Los Angeles Times noted the Peoples Temple's move into the old church: "People's Temple, a Disciples of Christ church, now occupies the old First Church building." After the mass suicide in Jonestown, the Times noted that the Peoples Temple had moved out of the "huge Italian Renaissance-style church" in 1977.

The church was designated as Historic-Cultural Monument no. 89 in 1971. In 2008, the church was operated as the "Iglesia Adventista Central," as shown in the adjacent picture. An interesting profile and several photographs of the church can be found on the Big Orange Landmarks web site.

National Register of Historic Places

In 1983, the Alvarado Terrace area was submitted to the Department of Interior to be considered for designation as the city's third officially recognized historic district. (Wilton Place and Whitley Heights were designated earlier.) To draw attention to the effort, many of the homes were opened to tours. The district obtained the recognition it sought in 1984 with its inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Pico Union became the city's 19th Historic Preservation Overlay Zone Historic Preservation Overlay Zone on August 10, 2004."

Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park,
Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park, 

Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park,
Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park, 

Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park,
Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park, 

Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park,
The Tudor-style Raphael House at 1353 Alvarado Terrace (HCM #87), built in 1903, was designed by architects Sumner P. Hunt and Wesley A. Eager. Listed for sale 09/2021 for $2.1M. Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park, 

Below are a few more pics of 1353 Alvarado Terrace interiors from 09/2021.






Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park,
Alvarado Terrace, historical homes, mary cummins, real estate appraiser, appraiser, los angeles, california, historic, hpoz, national register of historic places, real estate, appraisal, los angeles historic cultural monument, pico union, terrace park, 


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alvarado_Terrace_Historic_District


Mary Cummins of Cummins Real Estate is a certified residential licensed appraiser in Los Angeles, California. Mary Cummins is licensed by the California Bureau of Real Estate appraisers and has over 35 years of experience.


Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary, Cummins, #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit real estate, appraiser, appraisal, instructor, teacher, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Pasadena, Brentwood, Bel Air, California, licensed, permitted, certified, single family, condo, condominium, pud, hud, fannie mae, freddie mac, fha, uspap, certified, residential, certified resident, apartment building, multi-family, commercial, industrial, expert witness, civil, criminal, orea, dre, brea insurance, bonded, experienced, bilingual, spanish, english, form, 1004, 2055, 1073, land, raw, acreage, vacant, insurance, cost, income approach, market analysis, comparative, theory, appraisal theory, cost approach, sales, matched pairs, plot, plat, map, diagram, photo, photographs, photography, rear, front, street, subject, comparable, sold, listed, active, pending, expired, cancelled, listing, mls, multiple listing service, claw, themls, historical appraisal, facebook, linkedin